LaVoz
In English
En Español
In English
En Español
 
  Around the City
  Arts & Entertainment
  Automundo
  Business
  Classifieds
  Commentary
  Community
  Education
  El Mundo
  Environment
  From the Publisher
  Health
  Immigration
  La Vida Latina
  La Voz Special Editions
  La Voz NAHP Awards
  Letter to the Editor
  Mis Recuerdos
  My Money
  Nuestra Gente
  Of Special Interest
  Politics
  Pueblo/Southern Colorado
  Que Pasa
  Readers Speak Out
  Sports
  Student of the Week
  Technology
  Vecinos
  Where Are They Now?
  Archives
  Home
 
 
Low UVB exposure in pregnancy linked with higher risk of learning disabilities
 
La Voz Logo
 

By Source: University of Glasgow Communications and Public Affairs
News@lavozcolorado.com
 
07/17/2019

Too little sunlight – and specifically UVB exposure – in pregnancy has been linked with a higher risk of learning disabilities.

In a new study looking at more than 422,500 school-age children from across Scotland, researchers found that low UVB exposure during pregnancy was associated with risk of learning disabilities.

UVB exposure from sunlight is linked to the production of the essential nutrient vitamin D in the body.

Publishing their results in the journal Scientific Reports, University of Glasgow researchers linked sunshine hours data from the Met Office with the month in which children were conceived. They found that there was a statistically significant relationship between lower UVB exposure over the whole of pregnancy and the risk of learning disabilities.

The relationship was specific to UVB (not UVA) suggesting that the effect of sunlight was likely to be working via production of vitamin D.

During the antenatal period, the foetus undergoes rapid development and growth, making it susceptible to environmental exposures, with the potential of long-term consequences. Maternal UVB exposure promotes the production of vitamin D, which is important for normal brain development of a foetus.

The researchers also found a slightly stronger relationship with low UVB exposure in the first trimester, suggesting that early pregnancy may be the most vulnerable to the effects of insufficient UVB.

As a result of low levels of UVB radiation from sunlight, vitamin D deficiency is common over winter months in high latitude countries such as Scotland. With Scottish residents twice as likely to be vitamin D deficient than people living in other parts of the UK.

Professor Jill Pell, Director of the University of Glasgow’s Institute of Health and Wellbeing and lead author of the study, said: “Learning disabilities can have profound life-long effects on both the affected child and their family. The importance of our study is that it suggests a possible way to prevent learning disabilities in some children. Clinical trials are now needed to confirm whether taking vitamin D supplements during pregnancy could reduce the risk of learning disabilities.”

Of the 422,512 schoolchildren included in the study, 79,616 (18.8 percent) had a learning disability, 49,770 (23.1 percent) boys and 29,846 (14.4 percent) girls. The percentage of children with learning disabilities varied by month of conception, ranging from 16.5 percent among children conceived in July, to 21.0 percent among those conceived in February, March and April.

Dr Claire Hastie, who did the analysis, said “Our study linked routinely collected health and education data with environmental data enabling us to study a very large number of children in a way that would not be possible using traditional methods.”

The study, ‘Antenatal exposure to solar radiation and learning disabilities: Population cohort study of 422,512 children’ is published in Scientific Reports. The work was funded by HDR UK (Health Data Research UK). The paper can be viewed here:
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-45562-9.

 

 

 

 

 
Click on our advertising links for:
SERVICE DIRECTORY
CLASSIFIEDS
La Voz
'You Tube Videos'
An EXCLUSIVE La Voz Bilingue interview
with President Barack Obama
Pulsa aquí para más episodios

Follow La Voz on:

Tweeter FaceBook Tweeter
POLL QUESTION

 

© 2019 La Voz Bilingüe. All Rights Reserved.

Advertising | Media Kit | Contact Us | Disclaimer

12021 Pennsylvania St., #201, Thornton, CO 80241, Tel: 303-936-8556, Fax: 720-889-2455

 
Site Powered By: Multimedia X