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February is American Heart Month
 
Photo courtesy: Pixabay.com
 

By Joseph Rios
News@lavozcolorado.com
 
02/05/2020

It doesn’t matter how old you are, heart disease can strike at any time — and it is becoming more common for younger people to suffer from it, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the reason for that is slightly because conditions that lead to heart disease are starting to occur at younger ages. There are numerous factors that can lead to heart disease, including obesity, high cholesterol and smoking.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health says Hispanic American adults are less likely to have coronary heart disease than non-Hispanic White adults. Additionally, Hispanic Americans are less likely to die from heart disease than non-Hispanic white adults.

According to statistics from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health, Hispanics were 10 percent less likely to have coronary heart disease than non-Hispanic whites in 2012. Both Hispanic men and women were 30 percent less likely to die from heart disease than non-Hispanic whites in 2013, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health says.

According to the state of Colorado, one person dies from cardiovascular disease every hour in Colorado. Cardiovascular disease can include coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure and a stroke. In 2013, the leading cause of death among those who died in Colorado was cancer. However, heart disease was the second leading cause while strokes came in fifth. High blood pressure was the 17th leading cause of death in Colorado. The combination of heart disease and strokes was the leading cause of death in Colorado. The two were responsible for 24 percent of all deaths in Colorado.

In 2017, heart disease was the second leading killer of Coloradans, according to statistics from the American Heart Association. That year saw around 7,060 people in Colorado die from heart disease. Strokes were the fifth leading cause of deaths in Colorado in 2017, killing 1,988 Coloradans.

Additionally Colorado, African American residents had significantly higher death rates from heart disease compared to other race and ethnicity groups.

Although heart disease and strokes can be deadly, the two can be prevented. According to the state of Colorado, at least 200,000 deaths from heart disease and strokes in the United States each year can be preventable. You can control your heart health by eating healthy, not smoking, staying active and working with a. health care team to manage your blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Cardiovascular disease can be costly, the state of Colorado says. This year, $8.2 billion is projected to be expended with cardiovascular disease in the state.

February represents American Heart Month. It is a time to learn about factors that can lead to heart disease and steps you can take to helping your heart. On Feb. 7, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute is encouraging residents to wear red to promote awareness about heart disease.

 

 

 

 

 
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