LaVoz
In English
En Español
In English
En Español
 
  Around the City
  Arts & Entertainment
  Automundo
  Business
  Classifieds
  Commentary
  Community
  Education
  El Mundo
  Environment
  From the Publisher
  Health
  Immigration
  La Vida Latina
  La Voz Special Editions
  La Voz NAHP Awards
  Letter to the Editor
  Mis Recuerdos
  My Money
  Nuestra Gente
  Of Special Interest
  Politics
  Pueblo/Southern Colorado
  Que Pasa
  Sports
  Student of the Week
  Technology
  Vecinos
  Where Are They Now?
  Archives
  Home
 
 
A country without immigrant labor
 
La Voz Staff Photo
 

By David Conde
News@lavozcolorado.com
 
03/01/2017

You may have been watching a replay of Roots, the Alex Haley classic that traces American Black origins in West Africa. Roots chronicles their capture and ordeal characterized by centuries of slavery and the loss of identity tied to race, color and place. The novel and the television series is an expression of an epic attempt to recover what was lost by reconnecting the heritage line to its origins.

Even then, the more recent Black immigrants would fret about their American-born contemporaries’ inability to remember or care about where they came from. Perhaps this is because their struggle for survival was such that history telling them who they are became a luxury.

Curiously, the over 41 million immigrants in America today could very well repeat the words of Kunta Kinte in a different time, in a different setting and to a different people. The answer now compared to the answer then from a people facing slavery could sound more like an excuse for not guarding our freedom.

The immigrant community is now facing their own set of issues being played out in the national social, legal and political arena. Yet, their true place is in the heart of America’s economic well-being.

On Thursday, February 16th, a national day without immigrant labor took place in an effort to insert an economic argument that counters the political climate created by a campaign to discredit the value of immigrant work. Extensive coverage was given to restaurants where 1 out of every 4 workers and almost half of the chefs are immigrants.

The 2015 records indicate that 26.3 million or 16.7 percent of the workforce are foreign-born and half of them are Latinos. The three principle areas one can find immigrant workers is in the service industry, construction and farming.

One of the developing outcomes associated with the present administration’s deportation policy is that wages for the farm industry are going up. The law of supply and demand is making farmers the victims of a political process that they themselves largely supported.

Wages for farm work is up 36 percent in the last decade compared to 27 percent in non-farm work and farm profits have been going down for the fourth consecutive year. The U.S. Department of Agriculture projects farm wages to increase another 40 percent in the next 15 years.

This will force farmers to reduce their production by over half of what they are producing today. Fruit production for example, will drop by 61 percent.

That means that since the consumer will require 100 percent on the dinning table, the country will have to import that fruit most likely from Mexico and Central America and pay the extra costs of tariffs since there will be no NAFTA. By the way, this contradicts the very policy that is the basis for an America first theory that questions agreements like NAFTA.

Zippy Duvall, president of the American Farm Bureau Federation is on record as saying that “The farm labor discussion is around whether or not our country wants to import our labor or whether they want to import their food. I think the American people want to eat food that’s grown in America.”

Given the current political climate, food production may be an unpredictable affair depending on whether the immigrant farm worker feels safe from police raids and is wanted and appreciated. Americans stand to get a significant hit on their pocketbooks before coming to understand the real value of the worker in the fields that puts food on the table at very economic prices.

 

 

 

 

 
Click on our advertising links for:
SERVICE DIRECTORY
CLASSIFIEDS
La Voz
'You Tube Videos'
An EXCLUSIVE La Voz Bilingue interview
with President Barack Obama
Pulsa aquí para más episodios

Follow La Voz on:

Tweeter FaceBook Tweeter
POLL QUESTION

 

© 2017 La Voz Bilingüe. All Rights Reserved.

Advertising | Media Kit | Contact Us | Disclaimer

12021 Pennsylvania St., #201, Thornton, CO 80241, Tel: 303-936-8556, Fax: 720-889-2455

 
Site Powered By: Multimedia X